Program

DRAFT PROGRAM  
DAY 1: October 5, 2020
07:15Registration opens
08:00Breakfast
08:45Thanksgiving Address
09:00BCI and FAB Introduction
09:15Plenary Speaker
10:00Break
10:15Four concurrent workshops
11:15Plenary Speaker
12:00Lunch
13:00Four Concurrent Workshops
14:00Scavenger Hunt
15:00How to write a Climate Action Plan
15:45
Starting your Climate Action Plan
17:00Dinner
DAY 2: October 6, 2020
08:00Breakfast
08:45Welcome
09:00Four concurrent workshops
10:00Youth Panel
11:00Break
11:15Continue writing Climate Action Plan
12:15Lunch
13:15
14:00Finalize Climate Action Plans
15:00Break
15:15Sharing Climate Action Plan ideas
15:45Finale and Thanksgiving Address

Detailed Program – Draft

October 5, 2020

7:15 Registration opens located on the third floor of the Aquatarium

8:45 Thanksgiving Address
Abraham Francis, Environmental Program, Akwesasne

9:15 Plenary – Climate 101: What Do You Really Need To Know?
Curt Stager, Paul Smith’s College
You’re eager to help spread the word about climate change, but are you sure you have the science straight? Here’s a quick reminder of some of the basic “hot topics” that you’ll need to “know cold” and be able to present in clear and creative ways, so you are properly empowered in your climate outreach.

10:00 Break

10:15 Four Concurrent Workshops

First Nation’s and Climate Change
Abraham Francis, Akswesasne
Coming Soon!

Building Climate Resilience
Erin Griffin, Wild Center
In this interactive session, students will learn about climate resilience: how communities can withstand and even thrive despite severe impacts from climate change. Students will engage in a role playing activity that simulates how a community might respond to a climate influenced disaster.  Students will learn what impacts their community may be facing and what sections of their community may be most vulnerable to those impacts. Students will use this information to brainstorm ideas for how to best prepare their schools and communities for climate impacts. 

Working with Local Government – Catalyst for Community Climate Action
Robert Kiley, Kingston City Councillor
Would you like to be an agent of positive change across your community ? Have you ever wondered how to engage with local elected officials? This interactive workshop offers a “How To” guide for getting around City Halls and the workings of municipal government when it comes to climate action. Learn about the political process, resources that are available to you, and how you can influence it all to reduce emissions and bring people together.  

The Anthropocene Project
Desiree Arch, Royal Canadian Geographic Society
The Anthropocene is the proposed current geological epoch in which humans are the primary cause of permanent planetary change. Many students are unfamiliar with the idea that common, everyday activities place a demand on nature. From buying convenience foods at restaurants, to throwing plastic packaging in the trash, to purchasing fast fashion clothing. To raise awareness, we will be using photography, film, virtual and augmented reality to explore the complex and irreversible impact humans are having on the planet in the time of the Anthropocene.  

11:15 Plenary – Climate Change Effects Happening Now in Western Arctic Canada
Dr. Christopher Burn, Carleton University
Climate change will have a range of effects and these will vary within the landscape. Some effects have already started in Canada’s western Arctic, but they depend on the landscape’s structure and its history, especially how much ice is buried in the permafrost. The western Arctic has been warming steadily since 1970 but in the last 20 years the area has also had more rain in summer. We expect this as part of global warming. In different parts of the western Arctic we have seen slow warming of permafrost, dramatic sets of landslides, and collapsing of the ground surface with melting of buried ice. In eastern Ontario we should also expect a range of effects. 

12:00 Lunch

13:00 Four Concurrent Workshops

Building Climate Resilience
Erin Griffin, Wild Centre
In this interactive session, students will learn about climate resilience: how communities can withstand and even thrive despite severe impacts from climate change. Students will engage in a role playing activity that simulates how a community might respond to a climate influenced disaster.  Students will learn what impacts their community may be facing and what sections of their community may be most vulnerable to those impacts. Students will use this information to brainstorm ideas for how to best prepare their schools and communities for climate impacts. 

Nature Canada’s Save our Swallows Campaign
Aly Hyder Ali, Nature Canada
Save our Swallows is a campaign that aims to reverse long-standing declines in swallow population in Ontario. This work is supported by working with rural partners, creating behaviour changes (reducing/eliminating use of pesticides, providing habitat, etc), developing resources and strategies. These actions can help other bird/wildlife species as well, increasing biodiversity to mitigate impacts from climate change. In my presentation, I will explore the work that we have done in this campaign, and how students can take actions to protect biodiversity in their local areas to mitigate impacts from climate change.

The Anthropocene Project
Desiree Arch, Royal Canadian Geographic Society
The Anthropocene is the proposed current geological epoch in which humans are the primary cause of permanent planetary change. Many students are unfamiliar with the idea that common, everyday activities place a demand on nature. From buying convenience foods at restaurants, to throwing plastic packaging in the trash, to purchasing fast fashion clothing. To raise awareness, we will be using photography, film, virtual and augmented reality to explore the complex and irreversible impact humans are having on the planet in the time of the Anthropocene.  

How to talk With Your Parents About Climate Change
Amy Henson, Science North
To change minds, you have to change hearts. The biggest influencers in a family are the youngest voices and you can be that influencer in your family and beyond. All the science data in the world will not sway people to a new way of thinking, but using personal stories, asking the right questions and having meaningful conversations can. In this workshop, we’ll build and practice conversations while weaving in ways to create change at home and in your community.

14:00 Break and Scavenger Hunt

15:00 Writing a Climate Action Plan
Anik Hahn, Megan McKenna, Kaeling Hunter, Erin Griffin

15:45 Teams work on Climate Action Plans

17:00 Dinner

 

October 6, 2020

8:45 Welcome to Day 2

9:00 Four Concurrent Workshops

Tree Planting and Climate Change
Jim Hendry, Hendry Forest Service
Coming soon!

Climate Change and the Emergence of Tick-Borne Diseases
Dr. John Donovan, Rideau St. Lawrence Veterinary Services
Coming Soon!

Water Issues and Opportunities for Youth
Jaclyn Franceschini, River Institute
During my talk we will explore the importance of freshwater systems and many of the organisms that depend on them. Next, we will discuss threats that Climate Change poses on this delicate balance, and the different aspects that will be impacted. Finally, I will outline the many wonderful organizations that are offering youth programs where students can get involved and help reduce the impacts of Climate Change in their communities. 

How to talk With Your Parents About Climate Change
Amy Henson, Science North
To change minds, you have to change hearts. The biggest influencers in a family are the youngest voices and you can be that influencer in your family and beyond. All the science data in the world will not sway people to a new way of thinking, but using personal stories, asking the right questions and having meaningful conversations can. In this workshop, we’ll build and practice conversations while weaving in ways to create change at home and in your community.

10:00 Youth Panel
Details Coming Soon!

11:00 Break

11:15 Teams work on Climate Action Plans

12:15 Lunch

14:00 Climate Action Plans finalized

15:00 Break

15:15 Teams Share their Climate Action Plans

15:45 Finale and Thanksgiving Address